New regulations for hunters regarding Chronic Wasting Disease

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RAPID CITY, S.D. (KEVN) – Wildlife Biologist Steve Griffin says Chronic wasting disease has been in the Black Hills for almost twenty years.

“It’s been in the Black Hills for many many years, I think we found our first one in 2001. First whitetail doe down in fall river county and since it’s spread throughout the Black Hills not terribly to the north but the south we have it pretty heavily down south,” says Griffin.

The disease is almost fatal for the animals impacted, but not all animals can catch the virus.

“So the Cervidae family is affected by CWD which basically in South Dakota means whitetail, mule deer, and elk. Moose are affected by it we have a few moose that come through but we’ve never found it in moose,” says Griffin.

Over the summer, South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks passed new rules for the disposal and transportation of these animals out of the twelve infected counties: Bennett, Butte, Corson, Custer, Fall River, Haakon, Harding, Jackson, Meade, Lawrence, Pennington, and Tripp county.

41:06:03:16.  Interstate cervid carcass transportation restriction. Whole or partial cervid carcasses and head with antlers attached may not enter this state unless delivered to a licensed taxidermist, a game processor, or to the hunter’s domicile. Cervid carcasses passing through the state are exempt from this section. The provisions of this section are effective July 1, 2020.

41:06:03:17.  Intrastate cervid carcass transportation restriction. Whole or partial cervid carcasses and head with antlers attached may not be transported from an endemic area unless delivered to a licensed taxidermist, a game processor, or to the hunter’s domicile. The provisions of this section are effective July 1, 2020.

41:06:03:18.  Carcass disposal for hunter-harvested cervid. A person who transports cervid carcass parts from outside this state shall dispose of all remaining cervid carcass parts through a waste management provider or a permitted landfill.  A person who transports cervid carcass parts from an endemic area in this state shall dispose of all remaining cervid carcass parts through a waste management provider or a permitted landfill.  Cervid carcasses taken from an endemic area in this state that test negative for the disease are exempt from this section. The provisions of this section are effective July 1, 2020.

41:06:03:19.  Carcass disposal for wildlife processing facilities. Wildlife processing facilities, as defined by § 41:06:03:10, shall dispose of all remaining cervid carcass parts obtained from outside this state through a waste management provider or a permitted landfill. Wildlife processing facilities shall dispose of remaining cervid carcass parts obtained from an endemic area within this state through a waste management provider or a permitted landfill.  Game processers licensed by another state or federal entity shall dispose of carcasses as required by the conditions associated with the license. The provisions of this section are effective July 1, 2020.

41:09:11:07.  Cervid carcass disposal. A taxidermist shall dispose of remaining cervid carcass parts obtained from outside this state through a waste management provider or a permitted landfill.  A taxidermist shall dispose of remaining cervid carcass parts obtained from a known chronic wasting disease endemic area within this state through a waste management provider or permitted landfill. The provisions of this section are effective July 1, 2020.

Game, Fish, and Parks want hunters to be on the lookout for sickly animals and follow up with any concerns.

Copyright 2020 KEVN. All rights reserved.



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